Williamson County, Texas Criminal and Juvenile Defense Lawyer

Can you trick a Breathalyzer?

Summer is here, and you know what that means: parties, concerts and other outdoor events! And at many parties, you’ll find alcohol. Whether it’s a beer blast or a wine-and-cheese party on the lawn, one thing’s for sure—it’s easy to drink too much in the summer when alcohol is readily available at parties. Should you end up driving home tipsy (or drunk), there is always a chance you’ll be pulled over by the police and asked to use a Breathalyzer to see if you’re legally intoxicated.

Can you trick a Breathalyzer? That’s a question many drinkers ask. There are several ways people try to do so. For instance, they may spray their mouth with a breath freshener, eat some breath mints, or gargle with mouthwash. Here’s the deal: breath fresheners and mints may mask the smell, but they don’t change your blood alcohol content (BAC) readings. Meanwhile, mouthwash often has alcohol in it, so you may end up increasing your reading.

Some people try the old “stick a penny under the tongue” to beat the Breathalyzer, but that won’t work. Related to the penny myth are charcoal pills, garlic and various herbal formulas that claim to help a drunken person out. Sorry, they don’t work.

While many people who’ve had too much to drink would like to trick a Breathalyzer, it’s better to just get legal counsel to help with the situation. The Law Office of John C. Prezas, PLLC, offers a free initial consultation in Williamson County, Texas. Call 512-686-0105 to find out how John C. Prezas can help a person deal with problems arising from drinking and driving.


     

Disclaimer: This blog is opinion and made available by The Law Office of John C. Prezas for informational purposes only. The information herein is not legal advice and cannot substitute for the advice of a skilled attorney. Reading this blog and following any advice herein does not constitute an attorney-client relationship. The best outcomes result from individualized strategies developed by your attorney specifically tailored to your case. For legal advice specifically tailored to the facts of your case you need to retain a lawyer.

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About the Author
John C. Prezas is a Harvard Law School graduate and criminal defense attorney in Georgetown, Texas. John worked as both a felony and a misdemeanor prosecutor for six years in Williamson County, Texas. John is also a writer and lecturer on the subjects of criminal law and criminal appellate law.
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Disclaimer
This blog is published for informational purposes only; it contains no legal advice whatsoever. Publication of this blog does not create an attorney-client relationship. This blog strives to be unbiased in its reporting. All information on this blog should be checked for its accuracy and current applicability. This blog is published by the Law Office of John C. Prezas. John C. Prezas defends the residents of Central Texas against a variety of criminal charges.

This website is made available by The Law Office of John C. Prezas for informational purposes only and information herein is not legal advice. The information provided herein cannot substitute for the advice of a skilled attorney. The materials on this website might not reflect the most current legal developments or verdicts. Prior results do not guarantee a similar outcome. Every case is different and outcomes depend on a variety of factors. The best outcomes result from individualized strategies developed by your attorney specifically tailored to your case. Persons should not act upon information on this website without seeking professional legal counsel.The transmission and receipt of information contained on this website does not constitute an attorney-client relationship. Communications with The Law Office of John C. Prezas via this website or via email do not establish an attorney-client relationship. Until The Law Office of John C. Prezas has formally established an attorney-client relationship with you, do NOT send any confidential information.